Category Archives: What We're Reading

What we’re reading.

I’ve got less books than usual this week because so many people have been busy with other things lately!

I’m extremely jealous of the speedy co-worker who snagged Jason Offutt’s What Lurks Beyond: The Paranormal in Your Backyard:

Ghosts, aliens, a time traveler, and a mind-reading dog could be fiction, but Jason Offutt investigates true tales of these and other paranormal events that happened within 100 miles of his home. Offutt introduces ordinary folks who have encountered unexplained phenomena in everyday places and presents engaging accounts of their experiences. Getting a glimpse of this hidden world around us may prompt us to look–really look–in our own backyard.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

Our resident Jim Butcher fan was over the moon to be first in line for the newest Harry Dresden book, Side Jobs:

The first short story collection in the #1 New York Times bestselling series-including a brand-new Harry Dresden novella!

Here, together for the first time, are the shorter works of #1 New York Times bestselling author Jim Butcher-a compendium of cases that Harry and his cadre of allies managed to close in record time. The tales range from the deadly serious to the absurdly hilarious. Also included is a new, never-before-published novella that takes place after the cliff-hanger ending of the new April 2010 hardcover, Changes. This is a must-have collection for every devoted Harry Dresden fan as well as a perfect introduction for readers ready to meet Chicago’s only professional wizard.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

I recently finished up StarCrossed, by Elizabeth C. Bunce, which was fabulous, and easily as good as (if not better than) her first book:

16-year-old Digger thrives as a spy & sneak-thief among the feuding religious factions of Gerse. But when a routine job goes horribly wrong and her partner & lover Tegen is killed, she disguises herself in a group of young nobles & sneaks out of the city. Accepted as a lady-in-waiting at the stronghold of the powerful Nemair, she finds new peace & friendship (*and* some new targets). But when an old client from the city comes to the castle, she realizes her hosts may be planning the ultimate uprising against the king – & rather than true peace, she may be at the heart of the rebellion.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

Rupert Isaacson’s The Horse Boy : a Father’s Quest to Heal His Son has received a rave:

When his son Rowan was diagnosed with autism, Rupert Isaacson was devastated, afraid he might never be able to communicate with his child. But when Isaacson, a lifelong horseman, rode their neighbor’s horse with Rowan, Rowan improved immeasurably. He was struck with a crazy idea: why not take Rowan to Mongolia, the one place in the world where horses and shamanic healing intersected?

THE HORSE BOY is the dramatic and heartwarming story of that impossible adventure. In Mongolia, the family found undreamed of landscapes and people, unbearable setbacks, and advances beyond their wildest dreams. This is a deeply moving, truly one-of-a-kind story–of a family willing to go to the ends of the earth to help their son, and of a boy learning to connect with the world for the first time.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

One of our staff just finished Nancy Horan’s Loving Frank, which she absolutely adored — so much so that she was surprised, and now she’s wanting to read more about Frank Lloyd Wright and the Women’s Movement:

So writes Mamah Borthwick Cheney in her diary as she struggles to justify her clandestine love affair with Frank Lloyd Wright. Four years earlier, in 1903, Mamah and her husband, Edwin, had commissioned the renowned architect to design a new home for them. During the construction of the house, a powerful attraction developed between Mamah and Frank, and in time the lovers, each married with children, embarked on a course that would shock Chicago society and forever change their lives.

In this ambitious debut novel, fact and fiction blend together brilliantly. While scholars have largely relegated Mamah to a footnote in the life of America’s greatest architect, author Nancy Horan gives full weight to their dramatic love story and illuminates Cheney’s profound influence on Wright.

Drawing on years of research, Horan weaves little-known facts into a compelling narrative, vividly portraying the conflicts and struggles of a woman forced to choose between the roles of mother, wife, lover, and intellectual. Horan’s Mamah is a woman seeking to find her own place, her own creative calling in the world. Mamah’s is an unforgettable journey marked by choices that reshape her notions of love and responsibility, leading inexorably ultimately lead to this novel’s stunning conclusion.

Elegantly written and remarkably rich in detail, Loving Frank is a fitting tribute to a courageous woman, a national icon, and their timeless love story.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

Our resident expert on Literary Fan Fiction is about to start Rhett Butler’s People, by Donald McCraig:

Fully authorized by the Margaret Mitchell estate, Rhett Butler’s People is the astonishing and long-awaited novel that parallels the Great American Novel, Gone With The Wind. Twelve years in the making, the publication of Rhett Butler’s People marks a major and historic cultural event.
 
Through the storytelling mastery of award-winning writer Donald McCaig, the life and times of the dashing Rhett Butler unfolds.  Through Rhett’s eyes we meet the people who shaped his larger than life personality as it sprang from Margaret Mitchell’s unforgettable pages: Langston Butler, Rhett’s unyielding father; Rosemary his steadfast sister; Tunis Bonneau, Rhett’s best friend and a onetime slave; Belle Watling, the woman for whom Rhett cared long before he met Scarlett O’Hara at Twelve Oaks Plantation, on the fateful eve of the Civil War.
 
Of course there is Scarlett.  Katie Scarlett O’Hara, the headstrong, passionate woman whose life is inextricably entwined with Rhett’s: more like him than she cares to admit; more in love with him than she’ll ever know…
 
Brought to vivid and authentic life by the hand of a master, Rhett Butler’s People fulfills the dreams of those whose imaginations have been indelibly marked by Gone With The Wind.

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What we’re reading.

Some of the books that KFL staff members are reading at the moment (descriptions from the publishers will follow each title):

I just finished reading my first-ever P.D. James novel — and crazily enough, it wasn’t one of the Dalgliesh series!  It was actually the first Cordelia Gray mystery, An Unsuitable Job for a Woman.  I loved it, and would highly recommend it to fans of the Maisie Dobbs series:

Handsome Cambridge dropout Mark Callender died hanging by the neck with a faint trace of lipstick on his mouth. When the official verdict is suicide, his wealthy father hires fledgling private investigator Cordelia Gray to find out what led him to self-destruction. What she discovers instead is a twisting trail of secrets and sins, and the strong scent of murder.

An Unsuitable Job for a Woman introduces P. D. James’s courageous but vulnerable young detective, Cordelia Gray, in a “top-rated puzzle of peril that holds you all the way” (The New York Times).

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